From:
makaio@aracnet.com
Sent: 6/11/2001 12:41:53 AM
To:
gpsstash@yahoogroups.com
Cc:
Bcc:
Subject:

Re: Geocaching banned from public parks?


The following NPS Morning Report dated 3/21/2001 contains the
following geocaching statement...

http://www.nps.gov/morningreport/msg00806.html

Geocaching - There is a new web-based activity called geocaching that
has affected several National Park Service areas. The Ranger
Activities Division asked Olympic NP SA Mike Butler to investigate.
Here's his report: Geocaching is an activity in which participants
hide a cache and take a position at the location using a GPS
receiver.
The position is then published on the group's web site with an
invitation to search for the "treasure." Caches often contain a
notebook or log book and something the finder may take. The finder is
asked to put another item in the cache for others to discover and
will
often report the find on the web site. Several caches have been found
in National Park Service areas. The webmaster for the site
(www.geocaching.com) has been contacted. He was very surprised that
geocaching is illegal in NPS areas, and understood NPS concerns about
the damage geocaching has and can cause to historic, archeological
and
natural sites. He agreed to work with the Service to discourage
further geocaching activities in parks. Two related activities were
also discovered. Letterboxing (www.letterboxing.org) is a phenomenon
similar to geocaching in that a player takes directions from a web
site and uses those directions to find a hidden object. In
letterboxing, the directions come in the form of a riddle and the
hidden object is a stamp which the finder can use to stamp a piece of
paper to prove that he has visited the site. The web site showed the
location of at least two letterboxes in parks. The parks have been
notified, but the Service has not yet contacted the webmaster or game
managers. The Degree Confluence Project (www.confluence.org) is
another web-based activity where people try to visit various latitude
and longitude integer degree intersections and report their findings
on the web site. In this case, however, no objects are placed in the
ground, and there are no apparent regulatory violations in areas
where
cross-country travel is allowed or where the confluence is not on a
protected site. There has been no attempt to contact the project
organizers. [Mike Butler, SA, OLYM]


--- In gpsstash@y..., "GPS Navigator Magazine.com"
wrote:
> It is true that Geocaching has been banned form some public parks?
If so, which parks and why?