From:
paul_morrison@dfci.harvard.edu
Sent: 6/14/2001 10:57:45 PM
To:
gpsstash@yahoogroups.com
Cc:
Bcc:
Subject:

Re: Get Back On Track Please!


--- In gpsstash@y..., "WAJones" wrote:
> Right on Mary!
>
> Sometimes I think the environmentalists would prefer to have
miniature tv
> cameras planted in the wilderness so that people wouldn't
need to, or be
> allowed into the areas ever.

I think you might have missed Mary's point entirely. She just
wanted you all to stop whining and go find a cache.
No, you whine about environmentalists.
Mary might even be a tree hugger. She (I think) just wants people
to focus on constructive ideas about the sport and quit the
bitching.

I think there are environmental concerns attached to hunting a
cache. But that side is a little out to lunch on this board. They
don't believe a cache hunter has any common sense not to trod
on cryptobiotic crust or cut down fences.
The opposite side of the arguement is out to lunch too. Or else
they just don't get out much. This planet has varied terrain. Each
region has special issues that should be addressed when
called for in the cache description. Nothing complicated or
"Spoiler" in nature.
Examples:
On close approach do not close from the N or NE, wetlands.

On close approach do not close from the S, cryptobiotic crust.

On close approach do not close from E o NE in spring, nesting
egrets.

On close approach do not close from S, unmarked private land.

On close approach do not close from N in winter, possible thin
ice.

It doesn't need to be complicated. Cachers can figure out
canyons, rivers, cliffs, poison ivy. But when they get close I see
cachers getting the thrill of the hunt and they cut the corner. All
they need is a hint. And the reminders are different in the NW,
Utah desert,the Everglades and New England. This week the
warning in
Massachusetts is "watch your dog doesn't try to take on a
snapping turtle laying eggs, they may lose a paw.